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Solid Waste Management

Major waste management scheme on the anvil

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Source : The Hindu Date : 12.06.2009

Major waste management scheme on the anvil

D. Radhakrishnan

Project expected to be completed by the end of 2010

Photo: M. Sathyamoorthy

Focus on safe disposal: A truck carrying garbage entering the municipal dump yard at Theetukkal near Udhagamandalam. —

Udhagamandalam: With the civic administration according high priority to garbage management, waste-related problems are expected to come down steadily over the coming months, according to the Municipal Chairman R. Rajendran.

Speaking to ‘The Hindu’ here on Thursday, he said that the municipality was in the process of providing both short and long term solutions.

Stating that a major plan of action with private sector participation was in the process of being put in place, he said that the comprehensive solid waste management scheme was expected to be implemented at an estimated cost of Rs. 25 crore.

Pointing out that a detailed project report would be submitted by a Noida-based consultancy firm to the government soon, Mr. Rajendran said that it would include the construction of a compost yard and a plastic re-cycling unit at the dump yard of the municipality in Theetukkal near here.

Work on the project, which will be taken up on a Build, Operate and Transfer (BOT) basis was expected to be completed by the end of 2010.

The process of transferring ownership of the dump yard extending over about 15 acres from the Forest Department to the municipality was nearly over.

In order to prevent dumping of garbage on the main Ooty-Theetukkal-Parsons Valley Road, the municipality had recently laid roads inside the dump yard to facilitate movement of garbage trucks. Gradually facilities would be improved. Stating that the dump yard will be maintained properly, he expressed the confidence that the people residing nearby will not be subjected to inconvenience.

Last Updated on Friday, 12 June 2009 11:13
 

Corporation to have model wards for waste management

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Source : The Hindu Date : 08.06.2009

Corporation to have model wards for waste management

Special Correspondent

— Photo: S. Siva Saravanan

FOR CLEAN CITY: Mayor R. Venkatachalam (second left) and Deputy Mayor N. Karthik (second right) display stickers with guidelines on segregation of waste, launched on World Environment Day in the Coimbatore Corporation on Saturday.

COIMBATORE: Out of the 72 wards in the city, the Coimbatore Corporation will have nine as model wards for segregation of waste, as part of the Rs. 96-crore Integrated Solid Waste Management Programme to be implemented under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission, Corporation Commissioner Anshul Mishra said at the launch of a handbill on segregation on Saturday to mark the World Environment Day.

People in these wards will be educated on how to store biodegradable waste and non-biodegradable in separate bins (green for biodegradable and white for non-biodegradable).

The Corporation has brought out a sticker-type handbill containing the types of waste that should be stored in these bins. The handbill has pictorial guidelines; it has images of food waste over a picture of a green bin and batteries, bottles and bulbs over the white bin.

The image of Walt Disney character, Mickey Mouse, stands with a green hat near the green bin and with a white hat near the white bin. People would be asked to stick the handbill on the doors of their kitchen. The handbill was released by Mayor R. Venkatachalam on World Environment Day (Saturday). Deputy Mayor N. Karthik and Corporation officials were present at the launch.

Official sources in the Corporation said the Corporation would form ward committees to take the message of segregation to the people.

Each committee would be headed by the councillor of the respective ward. Sensitisation meetings for the councillors and the public would also be held.

The civic body was of the view that the solid waste management programme would not be successful without segregation of waste at source because different models of disposal would have to be adopted for biodegradable and non-biodegradable garbage.

At present, the lack of segregation was one of the major impediments to safe and complete disposal of waste. The Corporation had already provided bins to many areas and the process would continue.

Segregation was the vital foundation to waste management. Only if waste was segregated at the homes, the purpose of door-to-door collection or primary collection would be served.

Last Updated on Monday, 08 June 2009 13:47
 

Corporation to have model wards in the city

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Source : The Hindu Date : 08.06.2009

Corporation to have model wards in the city

Special Correspondent

This is part of the Integrated Solid Waste Management Programme

— Photo: S. Siva Saravanan

FOR CLEAN CITY: Mayor R. Venkatachalam (second left) and Deputy Mayor N. Karthik (second right) display stickers with guidelines on segregation of waste, launched on World Environment Day in the Coimbatore Corporation on Saturday.

COIMBATORE: Out of the 72 wards in the city, the Coimbatore Corporation will have nine as model wards for segregation of waste, as part of the Rs. 96-crore Integrated Solid Waste Management Programme to be implemented under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission, Corporation Commissioner Anshul Mishra said at the launch of a handbill on segregation on Saturday to mark the World Environment Day.

People in these wards will be educated on how to store biodegradable waste and non-biodegradable in separate bins (green for biodegradable and white for non-biodegradable).

The Corporation has brought out a sticker-type handbill containing the types of waste that should be stored in these bins. The handbill has pictorial guidelines; it has images of food waste over a picture of a green bin and batteries, bottles and bulbs over the white bin.

The image of Walt Disney character, Mickey Mouse, stands with a green hat near the green bin and with a white hat near the white bin. People would be asked to stick the handbill on the doors of their kitchen. The handbill was released by Mayor R. Venkatachalam on World Environment Day (Saturday). Deputy Mayor N. Karthik and Corporation officials were present at the launch.

Official sources in the Corporation said the Corporation would form ward committees to take the message of segregation to the people.

Each committee would be headed by the councillor of the respective ward. Sensitisation meetings for the councillors and the public would also be held.

The civic body was of the view that the solid waste management programme would not be successful without segregation of waste at source because different models of disposal would have to be adopted for biodegradable and non-biodegradable garbage.

At present, the lack of segregation was one of the major impediments to safe and complete disposal of waste. The Corporation had already provided bins to many areas and the process would continue.

Segregation was the vital foundation to waste management. Only if waste was segregated at the homes, the purpose of door-to-door collection or primary collection would be served. These had a bearing on the rest of the process such as secondary collection (from ramps to the compost yard) and disposal through composting and land filling. Biodegradable waste could be converted into manure through composting and non-biodegradable waste had to be disposed of through land filling.

Last Updated on Monday, 08 June 2009 13:40
 


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