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Corpn. gets ready for Phase II of storm water drain project

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The Hindu              06.01.2014

Corpn. gets ready for Phase II of storm water drain project

The Coimbatore Corporation has planned to clean the natural drains like Sanganoor Canal so that they carry only rain water.— File Photo: S. SIVA SARAVANAN
The Coimbatore Corporation has planned to clean the natural drains like Sanganoor Canal so that they carry only rain water.— File Photo: S. SIVA SARAVANAN

After completing the first phase of the storm water drain project, the Coimbatore Corporation wing executing projects under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission has started taking steps to start the second phase.

According to sources in the civic body, the JNNURM wing had almost completed the first phase of the project. It constructed drains for only 31.12 km to take the storm water to the nearest natural drain and provide linkages at 13 places for the purpose.

The wing would complete this work by January 15.

First phase

The Corporation had started the first phase of the project sometime in 2008. After initial delays and protests from the residents, the Corporation was able to force the contractors to increase the pace of constructing the drains. The first phase of the project covered portions of the city area — the 60 wards and involved constructing drains for 737 km at a cost of Rs. 180 crore.

The Government of India had financed the project in part. The State Government had contributed 20 per cent of the cost and the Corporation spent the rest — 30 per cent.

Under the second phase, the civic body would construct drains measuring a distance of 1,563 km at a cost of Rs. 800 crore.

Resolution

The proposal to the Central Government was based on a resolution the Corporation Council had passed sometime ago, the sources said.

The Corporation had also sent a proposal to the Government for Rs. 490 crore to clean and improve the five natural drains that run through the city.

The sources said that the Corporation would remove silt from Sanganoor, Karupparayan, Vilankurichi, Singanallur and Ganapathy drains, provide concrete embankments and also flooring with facility for water percolation, remove encroachments and construct roads on both sides of the Sanganoor drain.

The roads would link Trichy Road with Avanashi Road, Sathyamangalam Road and Mettupalayam Road, providing a short cut to motorists.

The sources added that the Corporation would start the project once the Government granted the funds.

 

Chennai Records Rise in Groundwater Level, Says Report

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The New Indian Express             13.12.2013

Chennai Records Rise in Groundwater Level, Says Report

The average ground water level in Chennai rose by 0.80 metres due to implementation of rainwater harvesting. Express file photo
The average ground water level in Chennai rose by 0.80 metres due to implementation of rainwater harvesting. Express file photo

The average ground water level in the city rose by 0.80 metres due to implementation of rainwater harvesting, according to Chennai Metro Water.

A Chennai Metro Water report said the water level was 4.20 metre from the surface, but after the rain water harvesting, the water level had risen to the level of 3.20 metre from the surface.

The ground water levels in Tiruvotiyur, Manali, Madhavaram, Tondiarpet, Royapuram, Thiru-Vi-Ka Nagar, Ambattur, Anna Nagar, Teynampet, Kodambakkam, Valasaravakkam, Alandur, Adyar, Perungudi and Sholinganallur had improved the report said. The ground water level in Alandur which was 7.45 metres deep before monsoon rose to 4.80 metres due to rain water harvesting, it said. It also said the groundwater quality, which gives a measure of the total dissolved solids had also improved in the range of 500 to 1700 particles per cubic metre.

Interestingly, this comes after the city installed eight lakh rain water harvesting structures. Besides, the Chennai Metropolitan Development Authority plans to carry out rainwater harvesting audit though a network of NGOs, who pioneered in this field.

The biggest challenge for ground water depletion is heavy extraction of ground water. According to estimates, the city requires 1100 mld of water a day while Metro Water supplies around 830 MLD a day. As such nearly 300 mld of water is extracted from the ground.

 

30 percent Buildings Yet to Instal RWH Structures in Vellore City

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The New Indian Express            03.12.2013

30 percent Buildings Yet to Instal RWH Structures in Vellore City

A model of the Rainwater Harvesting System displayed in the Vellore Corporation office | S DINESH
A model of the Rainwater Harvesting System displayed in the Vellore Corporation office | S DINESH

More than 30,000 buildings in Vellore city are yet to install rainwater harvesting structures (RWH).

The Vellore Corporation had intensified the implementation of the rainwater harvesting structures system in the city since June 2013. Door-to-door checks, seminars, meetings, mobile campaigns and awareness rallies were held in the city, advising the general public to construct RWH structures in all buildings.

Corporation town planning officer M Kannan said, “There are a total of 93,504 buildings, including residential and commercial ones, in the city. Of this, as many as 63,189 buildings had RWH structures. This constitutes 64.14 per cent of the total buildings in the city.”

However, Kannan he said that the drive had been intensified again to ensure that all buildings install rainwater harvesting structures.

Corporation Commissioner P Janaki Raveendran said that several steps had been taken by the Corporation  to ensure the installation of rainwater harvesting structures system in the buildings in the city, ahead of the rains. After the RWH systems were installed, the Corporation posted stickers to identify the buildings. This helped officials monitor implementation of the programme, she added.

 


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