Urban News

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
India Newspapers

Mumbai dumps 2,100mn litres of human waste in sea daily

Print PDF

The Times of India        15.05.2017  

Mumbai dumps 2,100mn litres of human waste in sea daily

MUMBAI: Where does Mumbai's waste go after you flush it down the toilet?

In a wooded patch close to the Bandra sea link toll booth, municipal engineers and maintenance staff monitor a constant gush of light brown water as a dull stench permeates the air.

Sub-engineer Abhijit Desai and his team at the waste water sewage treatment plant at Bandra Reclamation are among a group of silent workers at seven locations across the city, handling Mumbai's human and kitchen waste.

Managing this daily nauseating torrent is no mean task. Mumbai's coastline is now considered among the most polluted in the world.And one of the reasons for this is that the sewage receives a basic preliminary treatment before it is pumped into the sea.

The BMC's seven sewage plants located between Colaba, Malad and Bhandup work round-the-clock throughout the year.

Around 2,100 million litres a day (MLD) of waste water sewage is released into the Arabian Sea and the creeks. The waste that arrives at the plants is pumped 3km into the sea. The BMC's Malad sewage treatment plant, which handles the waste of 35 lakh people, is perhaps the worst of the seven in the city. The facility is limited to just preliminary treatment before the effluent is discharged directly in the Malad creek, which is surrounded by a large mangrove forest.

"The Malad creek does not have the required assimilative capacity due to nominal tidal flushing. The dissolved oxygen (DO) level in the Malad creek has reached zero, raising serious environmental concerns," states an internal note of the BMC's sewerage operation department. Officials said a DO level of 4 is considered safe for aquatic life. " Anything below that is dangerous," they said.Every day, around 240 MLD is released into the Malad creek.The Malad plant handles the waste of people living in Charkop, Gorai, Shimpoli, Goregaon and Dahisar.

Last month, a global study found the sea near the Mumbai coast to be among the world's most polluted. The database (Litterbase) compiled by Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Germany also found high quantity of plastic debris on the city's four beaches.

Civic engineers said around 25% of the city's waste, which comes from the slums, is not connected to the 1,915km sewer network and goes straight into nullahs and creeks.

Rakesh Kumar, director and Mumbai head of National NEERI, said this is a more serious problem because waste generated from slums is dumped totally untreated.

S R Narkar, chief engineer (Mumbai sewerage disposal project), said despite basic treatment of sewage, "it gets highly diluted by the time it is released 3km into the sea. The dilution factor is very high".

Back at the Bandra treatment plant, sub-engineer Desai pointed out that human feces dissolve completely by the time it reaches the plant. Inlet shafts remove floating material like plastic bags, bottles and solid waste. The waste water is then pushed into a shaft 63m below the ground. From there, large pipes (marine outfall) push the sewage 3.7km into the sea. The Bandra plant handles sewage from Vile Parle, Khar, Santa Cruz, Bandra, Dharavi and Kherwadi.

The Versova treatment plant has aerated lagoons where sewage is treated before around 120 MLD is released into the sea through a 1.5kmlong channel.

The seven existing plants were set up based on the master plan prepared in 1979. The first plant was commissioned in 1988 and the last one in Bandra commenced operations in 2003.

Top Comment

Farmers are dying in Maharashtra, Mumbai is filthy beyond belief, and what does BJP Government do? Build a HUGE USELESS Statue of Shivaji in the middle of the sea wasting THOUSANDS OF CRORES. Truly A... Read MoreYolanda Roberts

The BMC will now spend Rs 10,000 crore to set up seven new plants at the same locations where the existing ones stand.The new plants will include tertiary treatment. According to Narkar, the treated water will be recycled and reused for in dustrial gardening and supplied to construction sites. "These new sewage treatment facilities will be built according to Central Pollution Control Board norms," he said.
 

Segregation of waste at source must from June

Print PDF

The Times of India        15.05.2017  

Segregation of waste at source must from June

| Updated: May 15, 2017, 12.31 AM IST
Madurai: Come June, a new waste management system will come into force in the city, making it mandatory for residents to segregate garbage at source before it is collected by corporation workers.

The Madurai Corporation will start collecting waste material segregated into biodegradable and non-biodegradable waste from June 1. The corporation will also collect a fee ranging between Rs 10 and Rs 30,000 per month from residents, shops and commercial establishments as per the by-laws framed by the civic body under the Solid Waste Management Rules, 2016.

Commissioner Sandeep Nanduri, while taking to reporters on the sideline of Happy Street, said that they will start collecting segregated waste by June 1. Starting June 5, segregation at source will become mandatory. "Waste will be collected only if it is segregated into biodegradable and non-biodegradable material. There is nothing waste. The biodegradable waste can be used for various purposes, including production of biogas, electricity and fertilizers," he said.

The by-laws for waste segregation framed before April were kept for public viewing for a week's time from April 1. According to it, a fine will be imposed for not segregating wastes and also dumping waste in open areas, roadsides or waterbodies. The fine amount will range between Rs 100 and Rs 15, 000 according to the nature of the waste and those found violating the rules.

Earlier, addressing people during the event, Sandeep Nanduri urged them not to use plastic bags, which pollute the environment. He also advised residents to use water judiciously. "At this time of water crisis, the corporation with the help of the state government has been taking all possible steps to maintain water supply. I want you to conserve water and use it judiciously," he said.
 

City dumps 2,100mn litres of human waste in sea daily

Print PDF

The Times of India         14.05.2017 

City dumps 2,100mn litres of human waste in sea daily

| | May 14, 2017, 02.02 AM IST
Mumbai: Where does Mumbai's waste go after you flush it down the toilet?

In a wooded patch close to the Bandra sea link toll booth, municipal engineers and maintenance staff monitor a constant gush of light brown water as a dull stench permeates the air.

Sub-engineer Abhijit Desai and his team at the waste water sewage treatment plant at Bandra Reclamation are among a group of silent workers at seven locations across the city, handling Mumbai's human and kitchen waste.

Managing this daily nauseating torrent is no mean task. Mumbai's coastline is now considered among the most polluted in the world. And one of the reasons for this is that the sewage receives a basic preliminary treatment before it is pumped into the sea.

The BMC's seven sewage plants located between Colaba, Malad and Bhandup work round-the-clock throughout the year.

Around 2,100 million litres a day (MLD) of waste water sewage is released into the Arabian Sea and the creeks. The waste that arrives at the plants is pumped 3km into the sea.

The BMC's Malad sewage treatment plant, which handles the waste of 35 lakh people, is perhaps the worst. The facility is limited to just preliminary treatment before the effluent is discharged directly in the Malad creek, which is surrounded by a large mangrove forest. "The Malad creek does not have the required assimilative capacity due to nominal tidal flushing. The dissolved oxygen (DO) level in the Malad creek has reached zero, raising serious environmental concerns," states an internal note of the BMC's sewerage operation department. Officials said a DO level of 4 is considered safe for aquatic life. "Anything below that is dangerous," they said. Every day, around 240 MLD is released into the Malad creek. The Malad plant handles the waste of people living in Charkop, Gorai, Shimpoli, Goregaon and Dahisar.

Last month, a global study found the sea near the Mumbai coast to be among the world's most polluted. The database (Litterbase) compiled by Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Germany also found high quantity of plastic debris on the city's four beaches.

Civic engineers said around 25% of the city's waste, which comes from the slums, is not connected to the 1,915km sewer network and goes straight into nullahs and creeks.

Rakesh Kumar, director and Mumbai head of National NEERI, said this is a more serious problem because waste generated from slums is dumped totally untreated.
 


Page 8 of 4848